Tag: well-being

Mindfulness & Character Strengths – A Practical Guide To Flourishing

Filed in The Reading Room by on November 5, 2013 0 Comments

By Ryan M. Niemiec 

Image of the front cover of Mindfulness & Character StrengthsMindfulness and strengths are two of my favourite things so I was delighted to discover this book by Ryan M. Niemiec which explores the synergy between the two and describes Mindfulness-Based Strengths Practice (MBSP).  It is an excellent book for anybody interested in mindfulness and the VIA character strengths but particularly practitioners and teachers who want to run their own MBSP classes.

The basic premise behind MBSP is that by integrating mindfulness with character strengths you can positively impact your health and well-being and experience better relationships with those around you.  The way this is done is by adopting “strong mindfulness” and “mindful strengths use,”

Strong mindfulness means that you enhance your mindfulness practice by connecting with your strengths.   Continue Reading »

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Getting the measure of things

Filed in Blog by on August 10, 2013 6 Comments

I told you in my first post that I wanted a flourishing life but what does that actually mean?  How will I know when I have achieved it and how do I make sure that I enjoy the journey?  I intend to use as my reference guide positive psychologist Martin Seligman’s PERMA model of flourishing.

Seligman identified five factors that he believed were necessary for well-being and that contributed to human flourishing:  positive emotions; engagement; meaning; positive relationships and accomplishment.  He chose these factors because they each contribute towards well-being, they can be pursued for their own sake and it is possible to define and measure them independently of each other.  Collectively they create a theory of well-being.  So let’s take a look at the different elements to see how things measure up. Continue Reading »

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